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Copyright by the Israel Malacological Society

All Rights Reserved

TRITON # 7, March 2003

Table of Contents

 
Author/s
 
Page
1. MARINE MOLLUSCS
 

Henk K. Mienis

 

 

 

IS OSCILLA JOCOSA AN ECTOPARASITE OF TROCHUS ERITHREUS? (GASTROPODA, PYRAMIDELLIDAE & TROCHIDAE)

Abstract: A specimen of Trochus (Infundibulops) erithreus collected at Elat, Gulf of Aqaba, turned out to host three specimens of Oscilla jocosa, a Pyramidellid species. Since all Pyramidellids are parasites of other invertebrates O. jocosa is most probably a parasite of T. erithreus

1

 

 

 

Henk K. Mienis

 

REINSTATEMENT OF THE NAME TROCHUS FERREIRAI BOZZETTI

Abstract: Since Trochus nodulosus (A. Adams, 1855) is preoccupied by both Trochus nodulosus Solander in Brander, 1766 and Trochus nodulosus Gmelin, 1791, the correct name should read Trochus ferreirai Bozzetti, 1996

2

 

Henk K. Mienis

 

FIRST RECORDS OF THE ARK SHELL ARCOPSIS ORNATA (VIADER) FROM THE RED SEA (BIVALVIA, NOETIIDAE)

Abstract: Arcopsis ornata (Viader, 1951), Fam. Noetiidae, is here reported for the first time from the Gulf of Aqaba, Red Sea. It seems to live in rather deep water.

3

 

Henk K. Mienis

 

ON THE PRESENCE OF CUCULLAEA LABIATA IN THE RED SEA

Abstract: Recent specimens of Cucullaea labiata are here reported for the first time from two localities in the southern part of the Red Sea.

5

 

Henk K. Mienis

 

FIRST RECORD OF LUCINOMA BOREALIS FROM THE MEDITERRA- NEAN COAST OF ISRAEL

Abstract: : A single, damaged valve of Lucinoma borealis is here recorded for the first time from the Eastern Mediterranean off Israel.

6

 

Henk K. Mienis

 

 

 

 

PHALIUM BISULCATUM: DOES IT OCCUR IN THE RED SEA?

Abstract: Two records of Phalium (Semicassis) bisulcatum bisulcatum forma japonica are known from the Red Sea. It is very similar in shell characters to Phalium faurotis, a fairly common species in the Eritrean region. Since the two species are easily mixed up, characters have been enumerated how to distinguish faurotis from bisulcatum. Since larvae from the population of Phalium bisulcatum bisulcatum living in the Gulf of Aden may enter the Red Sea through the Bab el Mandeb, it may be expected to be present in the southern Red Sea.

7

 

 

 

 

Singer, B.S.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

A REVISION OF THE DENTALIUM REEVEI COMPLEX FROM THE RED SEA

Abstract: Five species have been widely accepted as synonyms of Dentalium reevei Fischer, 1871 namely: D. aratorum Cooke, 1886; D. clavus Cooke, 1886; D. lineolatum Cooke, 1886; D. laugieri Jousseaume, 1894 and D. macandrewi Boissevain, 1906. The idea that only one extremely variable species should be considered may have developed through a poor understanding of the appearance of D. clavus which changes its sculpture as it grows. The history of the 6 species is briefly discussed and they are examined for variations in aspects of the morphology of the shell especially the details of the sculpture of the ribs and interstices of fully grown shells. The depths at which they are found in the Gulf of Aqaba are noted to see if the species may be separated on a bathymetrical basis.
We recognise two species, D. reevei and D. clavus and rearrange the six species listed above into two groups according to the development of the shell, details of the sculpture and depth zones in which they live. Dentalium reevei is found at depths down to 120 meters in the Red Sea while D. clavus is found in shallow water in both the Red Sea and western Indian Ocean. A type locality is selected for D. laugieri.

9

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Rusmore-
Villaume, ML

 

 

EXTENSION OF RANGE OF ELLIPTOTELLINA PULCHELLA H. ADAMS, 1870 (SYN. GARI GRANULIFERA LAMY, 1938)


Abstract: This note is to document the extension of range of Elliptotellina pulchella to two new different points in the Egyptian Red Sea

18

 

 

E. L. Heiman

 

SHELLS OF EAST SINAI, AN ILLUSTRATED LIST: NERITIDAE

Abstract: Six Neritidae species inhabiting the waters bordering East Sinai in the Gulf of Aqaba are listed and illustrated. One species, Nerita quadricolor, is known from the southern part of the Gulf of Aqaba only.

20

 

E. L. Heiman

 

SHELLS OF EAST SINAI, AN ILLUSTRATED LIST: MURICIDAE, THE GENUS CHICOREUS

Abstract: Four species of the genus Chicoreus inhabiting the waters bordering East Sinai in the Gulf of Aqaba are listed and illustrated.

22

 

E. L. Heiman

 

 

SHELLS OF EAST SINAI, AN ILLUSTRATED LIST: HALIOTIDAE

Abstract: Three taxa of Haliotidae are known to live in the waters bordering East Sinai in the Gulf of Aqaba. There is a consensus among malacologists regarding the taxonomic identity of one of them-H. unilateralis-but two other taxa are confusing and deserve further study in order to establish their taxonomic identity.

24

 

 

 
2. LAND-SNAILS AND FRESH-WATER MOLLUSCS
 

Henk K. Mienis

 

PHYSELLA ACUTA WITH A BIFURCATED TENTACLE

Abstract: A specimen of the freshwater snail Physella acuta with a bifurcated right tentacle is briefly described. It was encountered in a small pond in the Zoological Garden of the Tel Aviv University.

26

 

Örstan, A

 

THE FIRST RECORD OF DISCUS ROTUNDATUS FROM TURKEY

Abstract: The land snail Discus rotundatus was collected at Anadolu Hisari, a 14th century fort in Istanbul. The lack of previous records of D. rotundatus from Turkey suggests that it is an introduced species.

27

 

 
3. ARCHAEOMALACOLOGY
 

Henk K. Mienis

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

MOLLUSCS FROM THE EXCAVATION OF TEL KABRI
(With an appendix dealing with Crustaceans found at that site)

Abstract: The excavation of Tel Kabri, an archaeological site containing remains from the Late Neolithic to the Iron Age II (5000-700 B.C.), yielded 329 archaeomalacological items. They belonged to at least 35 (sub)species. Most of the material consisted of local land- and freshwater snails (61%), but also molluscs were encountered from the Jordan River/Sea of Galilee, coastal rivers of the Levant, the Mediterranean Sea and even the river Nile in Egypt.
There is some evidence that the inhabitants exploited large land snails (Levantina & Helix) and marine snails (Patella) as a food source. A variety of molluscs from the Mediterranean Sea and maybe part of the local and imported pearly freshwater mussels were used as shell ornaments (beads, pendants). Although potsherds were encountered of which the interior showed a coating with a purple pigment, actual purple dye production took place most probably somewhere along the coast. All the inland molluscs found at the site are still living in the vicinity of Kabri: an indication that the climate was more or less the same as today.


APPENDIX: CRUSTACEANS FROM THE EXCAVATION OF TEL KABRI

Abstract: The excavation of Tel Kabri yielded seven parts of claws all belonging to the Levant freshwater crab Potamon potamios, a species still living today in aquatic biotopes in Western Galilea, Israel. These freshwater crabs carried out predation on aquatic molluscs (Melanopsis buccinoidea) sharing the same habitat. It is not clear from the few remnants whether the inhabitants of Tel Kabri exploited these crabs as a food source.

28

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Henk K. Mienis

 

 

 

 

SOME SURFACE FINDS OF SHELLS IN THE OLD CEMETERY NEAR THE MAMLUK TOWER OF RAMLA

Abstract: : Brief information is given concerning molluscs found on the surface of an ancient Muslim cemetery near the Mamluk tower in Ramla, Israel. Most of the shells turned out to originate either from the Mediterranean or Red Sea. Most of these marine shells show signs of manipulation and were most probably used as shell beads and pendants. A single land snail, known to live in the Ben Sheman area, might indicate that land snails were transported to Ramla as a food item. All the material dates back most likely to the Early Arab to Mamluk period.

38

 

 

 

 

 
4. NEWS
 
Henk K. Mienis THE MOLLUSC COLLECTION OF THE LATE JITZCHAK YARON
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